Tag Archives: positive behavior

Family Support Video 2: Setting Rules and Expectations

by Danielle Franchini-Muir, MS ED. BCBA

Video #2 in series of positive behavior shorts for parents!

Additional Resources:

First/Then Boards:

https://connectability.ca/visuals-engine/firstthen-board-popup/

http://www.autismcircuit.net/tool/first-then-card

Visual Schedules:

https://theinspiredtreehouse.com/how-to-make-a-visual-schedule/

http://www.victoriesnautism.com/schedule-activity-and-task-cards.html

https://challengingbehavior.cbcs.usf.edu/docs/backpack/BackpackConnection_routines_visual-schedules.pdf

Movement Breaks/Activities :

 

Positive Behavior Interventions & Supports (PBIS) Parent Video Series Part 1

As we all find ourselves at home to help flatten the curve of COVID-19, Easterseals would like to help provide some helpful resources.

Our Director of Behavioral Support Services, Danielle Franchini-Muir, MS Ed., BCBA, is developing a video series to help families implement positive behavior intervention supports at home.

In this first video, Danielle gives an overview of what positive behavior intervention supports (PBIS) is and how you can begin to implement this helpful tool at home.

PBIS Training

by Colleen Joyce

On Friday, June 10th, the Montgomery County Division of Easter Seals had a full day of PBIS training for the majority of the staff, including teachers, administrators, and behavioral specialists.

What is the PBIS methodology though?

PBIS is an acronym for Positive Behavioral Interventions and Support. One of the key components of its methodology involves one to one coaching and training. PBIS training shows teachers and staff members how to apply positive social behaviors in both classroom and non-classroom settings, so they can get positive results from their students in return. The PBIS method uses research and an evidence-based approach to school discipline to create a system that encourages supportive social competence and academic achievement. PBIS training aims to help disabled students reach social, emotional, and academic milestones.

The PBIS method focuses on four key elements:

  • Outcomes: Families, communities, educators, and students work together to meet behavioral and academic targets.
  • Data: Research and information regarding student behavioral status and modeling good social behaviors teaches positive behavioral expectations for students and creates a reward-based system, rather than a punishment-based system. Educators teach students how positive change can create favorable outcomes for themselves and others.
  • Practices: Evidence-based interventions and strategies, including supportive staff behavior, supportive student behavior, and supportive decision making are applied so students may reach goals.
  • Systems: Sustainable and meaningful supports involving families, educators, students, and the wider community allow the PBIS training to function and flourish for many years afterwards, allowing students to reach their goals and become their best selves.

On June 10th, representatives on behalf of the PBIS training method came to Easter Seals of SEPA – Gresh Center to give a rigorous presentation to staff members. Our staff learned a lot and they are now ready to implement technical, multi-tiered strategies in real classroom environments!

For more information on the PBIS training method, including webinars and a training slideshow go to their website: https://www.pbis.org/ .

Anyone can use Positive Behavior Strategies(PBIS)!

by Pat Potalivo

I wanted to share a short story about how effective PBIS is here at Easter Seals. My name is Pat, and I am an Administrative Assistant at the Bucks County division of Easter Seals.  One morning recently, a mother who has four boys came in to drop off two of her children at Friendship Academy. The boys were being very animated and were not listening to Mom as they were walking back to the classroom.  I walked over to the behavioral expectations poster in the lobby. I got the attention of the children, and specifically showed them  “Stay together,”  “Quiet Mouth,” and “listen(to Mom)”   At once, the boys began walking slowly and quietly through the hallway. The mother turned around to me, as they walked down the hallway, with a happy and  astonished look on her face.  These expectations are effective and easy to use.

pbis