Tag Archives: Music therapy

Music Therapy on Soundcloud

Music therapy is fun for everyone and familiarity can be soothing in a time of uncertainty.  That’s why we are so excited that Easterseals music therapist Amanda is sharing some of her songs on Soundcloud. The songs can be played through the website or app and she has made them available for download.

Grab the kids and have fun with a little music therapy!

 

 

Music Therapy with Sabrina

For so many of the kids, and in all honesty, most of the adults, music therapy is one of the most favorite parts of the day! As a result, it is one of the things we are missing most, so we are so grateful that Sabrina put some music therapy online for us.

In this series, she takes us from “hello” to “goodbye”, they are in order of a music therapy session, so that might be a fun way to start. If you really want to get the full experience, make a shaker to go along with the shaky song. Sabrina recommends a plastic container filled with something from around the house that will make a shaking sound. Her example is one with oats and one with lentils. Have fun with it a get creative!

Hello Song / Old Oak Tree

Body Rock

Shake, Shake

Breathing Song

Goodbye Song

Shout Out to our Physical Therapist Alex

by Nequetta Alfred

Pediatric Physical Therapists (PT) are aware of the joy they bring to children and families who achieve great strides even under difficult circumstances. Pediatric PT’s find creative ways and techniques to work with our kiddos who struggle with walking, running, or even jumping. Alex is one of our amazing PT’s at Easterseals who invests her sessions into each child by developing that one to one relationship with the goal of reaching maximum potential. She is patient with our children and consults with all team members involved including our teachers, teacher assistant’s, personal care assistants (PCA’s), behavior therapists, nurses, and the entire team at Easterseals.

Every week she is on time for classroom meetings which start as early as 8:15 am and she is consistent in reaching out to the team to assure an holistic approach. She works well with anyone who comes in contact with and our kiddos love the fun and joy she brings to each session. We see positive results when our therapist are just as excited to work with our kids. If you see Alex please give her a high five or hug for a well done job on simply being amazing at what she does.

During the session in the picture the student received a ride from the PT room back to the classroom while stretching her muscles which was quite funny to the student. The PCA (Tama) was very helpful in assuring safety and consistency with the sessions. One thing we know at Easterseals is a framework that’s built on teamwork surely gets results with the kids who are near and dear to our hearts. It’s so cool to see kids return to class happy and ready for their next session. The student transitioned straight to music and had a great day throughout the remainder of the day. The students day may have started with her teacher or PCA, but clearly ends with understanding it takes a village to keep those beautiful smiles in place while assuring our therapeutic goals are being met.

 
Health conditions that pediatric physical therapists address include:
  • Cerebral palsy
  • Traumatic brain injuries
  • Chronic pain
  • Cystic fibrosis
  • Cancer
  • Scoliosis
  • Developmental delays and movement disorders resulting from premature birth
 
Resources for parents with kids with PT’s:
 
 
 

 

The Sea of Easterseals

by Sabrina Stafford, MT-BC

Being able to say that I know what my true calling in life is at the age of 24 is a special gift that I have been handed.

I was blessed enough to ring in my New Year’s Day next to my sister wearing bright orange jackets on the Easterseals Float in the Rose Parade in Pasadena, California. I put my arm around Sophia as we waved for three hours at strangers who smiled and waved at us, wishing us a “Happy New Year!” Although my brother, Sammy, could not attend the parade with us due to his medical needs, I knew that he was safe, healthy, and happy at home watching us on TV.

Sophia and I were nominated by our local Easterseals affiliate to represent us nationally on the float. With us were 10 other individuals who have benefited from Easterseals. Although I was only with these individuals for a few short days, I was able to make connections that I still hold with me in my heart. I think about Reagan, who advocates for herself and others with verbal apraxia using social media as her outlet. I think about Danny, who gives a voice to those with disabilities and how important it is to have “hope” in our lives. I think about Lora and her overall passion for Easterseals (and Dr. Who). And I think about Kaison, our youngest float rider, who couldn’t stop talking about how excited he was to be on the float and celebrate Easterseals with the world. I could go on about how inspiring it was to not only ride the float with these individuals but spread the word about the magic of Easterseals with thousands of people.

About a quarter of a way through the parade, I saw something beautiful: a sea of orange. That’s right, I saw a whole section of people wearing orange hats, orange shirts, and waving orange tassels in the air. These people were cheering for us and clapping their hands. Amongst the sea, were my parents who I was lucky enough to bring along with me on this adventure. Although Sophia and I were on the opposite side of the float, we frantically spun our chairs around and waved our arms high up in the air to say hi.

Besides seeing and hearing this orange sea, I could FEEL it. I have never been in an atmosphere with so much pride, love, and honor as I did during the Rose Parade. These people were excited to celebrate Easterseals and celebrate all that makes up our disability inclusive community. Easterseals is my home outside of the home my parents have created for me, my brother and my sister. Although I am employed at Easterseals as a music therapist, my role is so much more than that. Thanks to Easterseals, I am a sibling, a disability activist, a daughter, a voice for my brother and sister and most importantly, I am myself every single day and that is what my true calling in life is.

 

Music and Memories

by Sabrina Stafford

When I received the news that I would be interning at Easterseals back in December of 2015, I was ecstatic. Being the oldest sibling of two children with special needs, I am used to most special education programs being familiar with my family; but this was different. Easterseals had been a part of not only my brother and sister’s lives but also mine. I attended the Sibshop program that was available in the evenings to siblings of children who attended Easterseals. This program was very important to me as a little girl (and I’m not just saying that because they had free pizza).

Sibshop taught me that although being a sibling is difficult, it is also incredibly rewarding. My siblings are a blessing. Without them, I wouldn’t have been able to easily learn values such as patience, empathy and hope. When I walked into the doors of the Delaware County Division of Easterseals after accepting the position as the Music Therapist, I felt like I was walking into Easterseals as a little girl back in the early 2000’s.

My brother, Sammy, graduated from Easterseals in 2000. He is currently 22 years old and a graduate from Elwyn’s Davidson School. Sammy once was a student in the APS classroom. Sammy received in-home services such as physical, occupational, and speech therapy. In fact, Ms. Paula, Sammy’s previous PT still works at Easterseals today. What a surprise it was for me to recognize a familiar face on my first week as an intern! Sammy is healthy and strong and enjoys his days socializing at home with family and his nurses.

My sister, Sophia, graduated from Easterseals in 2006. She is now 17 years old and attends a life-skills class at Penncrest High School. Sophia was one of the first children to attend the Friendship academy at the Delaware County Division. Sophia continues to enjoy school, especially socializing with peers her age. She attends all of her high school dances and is also a member of her student council and honors society. Sophia also works at The Media Library as part of her life-skills curriculum.

I am a proud sibling of both Sammy and Sophia. Of course my special family has come with challenges, but those challenges are heavily outweighed by the benefits. Easterseals has been a small-knit community for me and my family, and continues to be a supportive environment for me as a newly professional Music Therapist.

Although Sammy and Sophia have both graduated from Easterseals, they bring the spirit and warmth of the Easterseals community with them. They will continue to hold Easterseals in their hearts, just as I continue to do every day. It has been such a rewarding experience for me working at Easterseals; I feel like I was born to have this job. I am so very thankful for the life experiences that prepared me for my endeavors at Easterseals. Because of this, I wake up every day with a smile knowing that without my siblings, and without Easterseals, I wouldn’t be the person I am today.

Music Makes it Work

by Michael Murphy

Dan walks in right on time, but circle has run long at Friendship Academy. Dan doesn’t mind, he readies himself for his session. The children watch him as he does, waiting to get to say hello, waiting for their turn to find their spot on the carpet for music. As we wrap up our circle routine, a couple songs to go, the children look back at me and continue. With each song, Dan starts to play along, strumming in the background. We tend to make up songs, but that doesn’t slow him down. Dan goes along and adds another experience to our circle. He is in no rush, but increases the pace along with my song. Each child hears their name, jumps up from their chair and hurries to their carpet square for music. Dan praises their walking feet, greets them and listens to their quick stories about their day or comments on a new Paw Patrol shirt.

Music therapy adds something special to our classrooms. We all sing songs to our students, it serves an educational purpose and provides functional language, but there is something different about Music Therapy. The students are always excited to see Dan, they’re ready to sing the moment he walks in. Our quietest kids jump into “Hail Hail the Gang’s all here,” One of Dan’s welcome songs. Students call out their requests, and Dan finds a way to redirect or work in a new song or two. A towering teacher, Dan spends time on his feet, at eye level with the kids or works to control the gaze of students, willing to do what it takes to maintain that attention and push children to another level of focus. One thing at a time, Dan has all the time in the world to spend with each student until they give him something special for that day; a smile, a word, a sentence… Dan asks for a lot, but gets exactly what he needs before he continues.

We’ve seen shy kids open up, quiet kids yell, “busy” kids slow down and reluctant kids jump in. They throw curveballs at Dan and he throws them right back. “Z,Y,X,W…” Dan starts “his” ABCs. The children shout “NO!”, stopping his song. “That’s not how it goes” says a student who months before spoke in only grunts and groans. Commanding the attention and participation of a big concert of adults is cool, but there cannot be anything more difficult than getting a group of children to listen to your every word, chord or cue. Dan does it.

The exciting part about Music Therapy is that the same song is never really “the same song”. Either Dan plays it different, the children sing it differently, maybe the support staff adds a little something extra. It depends on the day, the weather, what the kids had for breakfast. Each session is exciting and each session ends too soon.

“Music time is over,” begins. Heads hang low, students sing along. Snack comes next, but they wont find solace in their Goldfish and fruit snacks. Dan’s time has ended, they have to wait a whole half hour to hear Dan’s songs blare in another classroom. Different again, effective again. They shout goodbye to Dan, they thank him. If only they knew how to ask for an encore, they would never let him leave. Music Therapy works and it is awesome to watch.