Category Archives: Community Partners

Introducing our Volunteer Handy Man, Lew Oser

By Loretta Meola, Teaching Assistant in Bucks Division

Lew Oser has been volunteering his time and talent with Easterseals and has become part of the family. In the past, he has shared his creative woodworking skills by making several props for our carnivals. He has made two construction paper holders, and a tray holder for the Dolphin room. This year, Lew repaired the “practice” stairs in the school gym. He donates his “spare” time to complete these projects and provides all of the materials needed. Lew loves our Easterseals children! And we love Lew!

 

Learning to use the 3D printer

by Kristine DelMonte

Disclaimer: I am not an Assistive Technology (AT) professional, nor am I an OT or a PT.

I work in Easterseals’ Development Department, working to cultivate volunteer experiences and corporate engagement.

But when I received an email from the AT Department looking for staff members to receive training on the 3D Printers we received last fall – thanks to a generous grant from the Comcast Foundation — I signed up right away.

Last week I participated in our first of three training sessions. There were about 11 of us plus the instructor, Marcia Leinweber, the 3D printing expert from the AT Department. I am pretty sure I was the LEAST knowledgeable person there, I’d never even seen the printer at work until that day. But judging from the energy in the room it was evident that the rest of the staff knew that what they were about to learn could provide solutions to some of tricky problems they face on a daily basis.

First, Marcia provided an overview of the many ways the printer can be used, and showed how it can be used to make assistive technology – from printing tactile books for kids with vision impairment, to printing pieces to fix therapeutic equipment, to printing switches used to adapt toys. Next, we logged on to a website called “Thingiverse” to discover the designs that we will print before the next class (we have homework!).

Using the 3D Printer isn’t likely to be part of my normal work day, but I am glad to be given the chance to more fully understand how to use it – and more importantly, to understand the many ways our staff can use it to make positive differences in the lives of the kiddos we serve.

When companies like Comcast invest in organizations like Easterseals, the kids we serve benefit in a million little ways. I can’t wait to see how our staff use the 3D printer to make assistive technology – and help our kids to be 100% included and 100% empowered.

Maker Spaces Launched at Easterseals SE PA with Workshops

by Sandy Masayko

The Assistive Technology Department, working in collaboration with our grant funder Comcast and our community partners Science Leadership Academy, Drexel University, Project Vive and MakerBot, is excited to report that our development of Maker Spaces at Easterseals SE PA is well underway! This project consists of two parts: Education of Easterseals staff and local high school student education to provide the basis for creation of Assistive Technology (AT); and setting up maker spaces at each Easterseals SE PA approved private school. The maker spaces will be supplied with 3D printers, soldering kits, moldable plastics, tools, and more. But before anyone can use this new high tech equipment, they need to learn how to design solutions to meet needs and the basics of use of the tools. To meet this need, the AT Department organized two workshops in the fall.

Workshop 1 was held at Drexel University’s Westphal College of Design in September and focused on 3D printing. After a review of AT by Sandy Masayko and an overview of the multiple use of 3D printers by Laurie McGowan, Laura Slatkoff shared her personal experiences in discovering 3D printing and using it to make a customized keyguard for a student. Marcia Leinweber introduced step by step instructions for Computer Assisted Design. Mary Elizabeth McCulloch of Project Vive presented concepts to consider in the design process. The thirty participants then got to work on their shared computers to design the top of a switch. AT Staff members, assisted by Science Leadership Academy (SLA) students who were familiar with 3D design, coached the participants. During the workshop, the SLA students increased their knowledge of AT, and they also videoed and photographed the workshop. At the end of the workshop, Easterseals staff members had homework to complete over the two months before the next workshop: participants were asked to finish their designs and email them to Marcia for printing on the Makerbot 3D printer.

The next workshop, held at SLA in November, allowed the participants to complete their design by constructing a switch for AT. Switch assembly necessitated soldering and wiring of the switch, activities taught by Mary Elizabeth and Joey McCulloch from Project Vive. The participants also learned what tools were in the Maker Spaces and how to use them. Laurie McGowan led participants in creating battery interrupters that can be used to enable toys and devices to be activated with a switch. Sandy introduced how to use a moldable plastic that can be used to create adaptations. As with the first workshop, the SLA students proved to be great coaches to ES staff members as they learned to wire and solder.

Response by the staff to the workshop was overwhelmingly positive. In our pre and post testing for each workshop, the staff members indicated that they significantly increased their knowledge of AT, 3 D printing and tools for creating solutions for people with disabilities. The next phase of the project will be establishment of the Maker Spaces at each approved private school sites. We can’t wait to see what our staff will create!

More Customized Chairs from the “Cardboard Fairy”

by Sandy Masayko

These beautiful customized chairs and slant boards not only meet children’s seating needs, they reflect the children’s interests and are very attractive. All of this adaptive design work has been done by our talented and valuable Cardboard Fairy, Dorothy Hess, who meets with the children’s therapists to determine best seating. Thank you, Dorothy, for continuing to work with the children who are served by Easterseals!

Cardboard Fairy Is Still at Work!

by Sandy Masayko

The Cardboard Fairy, also known as Dorothy Hess, is still spreading her magic around to Easterseals children. Her latest creations include custom-made chairs, trays, benches and steps. Dorothy is not only a talented designer, she is also an artist who decorates her creations with pictures of items that have special meaning to the child or family. She has fabricated items for children in our schools as well as young children in the community. We are grateful for Dorothy’s work and dedication in creating beautiful and functional equipment.

Project Vive Repairs Easterseals GoBabyGo Cars

by Sandy Masayko

Thanks to Project Vive, our wonderful volunteer partners from State College, Easterseals students will soon be driving their adapted vehicles again. After a year of hard use, the cars needed some repairs, and those repairs were beyond the abilities of our AT Team.

So Project Vive came to the rescue! Braving the perils of the Schuylkill Expressway at rush hour, Project Vive came by van in mid May to transport the adapted cars back to State College where the engineers at Project Vive could repair starters, switches and driving mechanisms. The engineers will be adapting some of the cars with new capabilities such as joystick control. The volunteers took a few other broken items with them as well as the cars.

Three cars have already been returned to the Yaffe Center. We are very grateful for the help we get from Project Vive staff.

We will be working with Project Vive to test out some of their unique augmentative/ alternative communication products. For more information about the exciting work that Project Vive is doing to design low cost augmentative communication, visit their website

Check out the pictures of the Project Vive volunteers loading up our kiddie cars into their van, and some of the refurbished cars upon return to Yaffe Center.

The Odyssey of Giving Back!

by Kirstyn O’Donnell

When 3:30 p.m. hits and my shift at Easterseals is done for the day, home is the last thing on my mind. Almost every other day, I am on my way to an Odyssey of the Mind meeting, that myself and my friend coach. What is Odyssey of the Mind? In short, it’s a sport for your mind. It’s a team everyone can join from kindergarten to twelfth grade to problem solve in a creative way. They use those problem solving skills in a skit that they perform later in the year at regional competition.

On Monday, March 19th, the Pennsbury High School Odyssey of the Mind students visted Easterseals with three boxes of Spring Meal Packages. The Students- Rowan Leventhal, Sarah Uhlman, Danielle Gershman, Becca Uhlman, and Noah Petroski, gathered food for over two weeks with the full intention of giving their donations to some Easterseals families. When the students arrived at the school, they sorted a big box that was overflowing with food into thee separate boxes. Then they were able to tour the school. The air was filled with question after question as they learned about what the staff at Easterseals provides to the children in our community. They were able to see what the school has to offer and were in awe to see the classrooms, the gym and the sensory room.

The students were also able to see some of the equipment that the children use daily, such as standers and gait trainers. They learned how and why these items are used. What they loved most about Easterseals was how the staff finds creative ways to help the children progress in their daily lives. The students later told me that Easterseals was something that they have never experienced before. In that hour and a half of time, they learned something that was very important. They learned that no matter who you are, or how old you may be, giving back to your community is always important. One thing is for sure, Easterseals impacted their lives and they are very excited to return one day in the future!

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students working on their donations.