It Doesn’t Get Better Than This

by Jeanine Johnson

I know, I know, I keep talking about how amazing Easterseals is. But it IS truly amazing. Despite working in an administrative capacity, there are ample opportunities to interact with the children. There is a welcoming culture here at Easterseals, and I am one who has chosen to take advantage of this culture. I have made interacting with the children an integral part of my day, taking breaks from the monotony of office work and visiting classrooms.

Oh, the payout is grand!! Not only do I get to know the children, but they get to know me. As a result, I get daily visits from several children before they board the buses to go home. I’ve been told those children are not happy when I’m not here to receive them. BIG SMILE!! I even have the honor of being included as one of the “people options” on one of the student’s communication device. When I hear “Ms. Jeanine” coming from the hallway, I know Vanessa is coming to pay me a visit. How cool is that!

Even though I am not a part of the education team, I’m still a part of the children’s learning experiences. Whether I’m coaxing a friend to use her words, identifying colors, blowing bubbles, sharing or practicing manners, we are all learning. I think in life we are all both Teachers and Students. I know I have learned a lot from the kids. Most importantly remembering to find joy in the little things, and appreciating the significance of determination, trust, and unconditional love. Whenever I need a “Pick-Me-Up” or want to “Fall in Love” all over again, I visit with the kids!

Lifetime Imprints

by Jeanine Johnson

The other day I was sitting and reflecting fondly on the last year. I made a lot of meaningful connections with the children here at Easterseals. As I have spoken of before, I was both sad to see some leave, but excited for the growth and progress that enabled them to move forward, on to the next adventure in their lives. I was comforted in the thought that maybe, just maybe, I’d be able to hold on to some of these connections, at least a little longer. I’m sitting here smiling because I have. Don’t know how long it will last, but I am holding on to and enjoying every opportunity that presents itself.

In August I attended a 5th Birthday party for Maximo. He’s a former student who left Easterseals early because his family relocated. During his time here he managed to capture everyone’s heart. We were all disappointed that our time with him was cut short. I was overjoyed that I was invited to share in his birthday celebration. It was nice being able to see him and, to once again, experience that magical smile. His mother sends me pictures periodically, which always brightens my day immensely.

In December I met up with one of my favorite graduates, Mung. My daughter, Autumn, and I treated Mung and his mother to lunch in Center City, Philadelphia. We had an opportunity to catch up on all that has been going on with him and his transitioning to a new school. He has always been somewhat of a character having “beyond his years” humor and sarcasm. I was delighted to see that hadn’t changed.

What’s been very evident to me is how much that Easterseals has meant to these families. I am so glad that their faith in entrusting us with the care of their children was well placed. The impact our programs have for these children will remain with them for years to come. The impact the children have had on me will last my lifetime.

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lunch with Mung

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Maximo’s birthday

Music and Memories

by Sabrina Stafford

When I received the news that I would be interning at Easterseals back in December of 2015, I was ecstatic. Being the oldest sibling of two children with special needs, I am used to most special education programs being familiar with my family; but this was different. Easterseals had been a part of not only my brother and sister’s lives but also mine. I attended the Sibshop program that was available in the evenings to siblings of children who attended Easterseals. This program was very important to me as a little girl (and I’m not just saying that because they had free pizza).

Sibshop taught me that although being a sibling is difficult, it is also incredibly rewarding. My siblings are a blessing. Without them, I wouldn’t have been able to easily learn values such as patience, empathy and hope. When I walked into the doors of the Delaware County Division of Easterseals after accepting the position as the Music Therapist, I felt like I was walking into Easterseals as a little girl back in the early 2000’s.

My brother, Sammy, graduated from Easterseals in 2000. He is currently 22 years old and a graduate from Elwyn’s Davidson School. Sammy once was a student in the APS classroom. Sammy received in-home services such as physical, occupational, and speech therapy. In fact, Ms. Paula, Sammy’s previous PT still works at Easterseals today. What a surprise it was for me to recognize a familiar face on my first week as an intern! Sammy is healthy and strong and enjoys his days socializing at home with family and his nurses.

My sister, Sophia, graduated from Easterseals in 2006. She is now 17 years old and attends a life-skills class at Penncrest High School. Sophia was one of the first children to attend the Friendship academy at the Delaware County Division. Sophia continues to enjoy school, especially socializing with peers her age. She attends all of her high school dances and is also a member of her student council and honors society. Sophia also works at The Media Library as part of her life-skills curriculum.

I am a proud sibling of both Sammy and Sophia. Of course my special family has come with challenges, but those challenges are heavily outweighed by the benefits. Easterseals has been a small-knit community for me and my family, and continues to be a supportive environment for me as a newly professional Music Therapist.

Although Sammy and Sophia have both graduated from Easterseals, they bring the spirit and warmth of the Easterseals community with them. They will continue to hold Easterseals in their hearts, just as I continue to do every day. It has been such a rewarding experience for me working at Easterseals; I feel like I was born to have this job. I am so very thankful for the life experiences that prepared me for my endeavors at Easterseals. Because of this, I wake up every day with a smile knowing that without my siblings, and without Easterseals, I wouldn’t be the person I am today.

The Odyssey of Giving Back!

by Kirstyn O’Donnell

When 3:30 p.m. hits and my shift at Easterseals is done for the day, home is the last thing on my mind. Almost every other day, I am on my way to an Odyssey of the Mind meeting, that myself and my friend coach. What is Odyssey of the Mind? In short, it’s a sport for your mind. It’s a team everyone can join from kindergarten to twelfth grade to problem solve in a creative way. They use those problem solving skills in a skit that they perform later in the year at regional competition.

On Monday, March 19th, the Pennsbury High School Odyssey of the Mind students visted Easterseals with three boxes of Spring Meal Packages. The Students- Rowan Leventhal, Sarah Uhlman, Danielle Gershman, Becca Uhlman, and Noah Petroski, gathered food for over two weeks with the full intention of giving their donations to some Easterseals families. When the students arrived at the school, they sorted a big box that was overflowing with food into thee separate boxes. Then they were able to tour the school. The air was filled with question after question as they learned about what the staff at Easterseals provides to the children in our community. They were able to see what the school has to offer and were in awe to see the classrooms, the gym and the sensory room.

The students were also able to see some of the equipment that the children use daily, such as standers and gait trainers. They learned how and why these items are used. What they loved most about Easterseals was how the staff finds creative ways to help the children progress in their daily lives. The students later told me that Easterseals was something that they have never experienced before. In that hour and a half of time, they learned something that was very important. They learned that no matter who you are, or how old you may be, giving back to your community is always important. One thing is for sure, Easterseals impacted their lives and they are very excited to return one day in the future!

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students working on their donations.

Cardboard Fairy

by Susan Lowenstein

What if I were to tell you that there is a cardboard fairy that visits Easterseals in Bucks County every few weeks? She delivers hand-made adaptive equipment created out of cardboard that our children can use during their day at school to be more successful. You would think I have lost my mind. But it’s true! Well, sort of true. The material that this “fairy” uses is a sturdier and thicker version of cardboard called tri-wall. It can be purchased from stores like Staples or Lowe’s, but has to be specially ordered. So…have I piqued your curiosity? Want to learn more about our “cardboard fairy”?

Her name is Dorothy Hess. She was a Pharmaceutical marketing executive for many years, but now that she is retired, she is using her creativity and resourcefulness as well as her artistic abilities to help the children at Easterseals achieve their full potential! How does she do this, you ask?

Dorothy completed a 3 day volunteer training through a company called Adaptive Design Association. It was this training, along with her own problem solving and analytic skills, that have prepared her to come to Easterseals to design and create various products for our children. Some examples include:

  • A completely customized chair for young boy named Javohn who attends our APS program. We were having difficulty fitting him in any of our other student chairs. Javohn has shorter legs and arms, but a longer torso compared to his typically developing peers. We had trialed him in many of our chairs, even those that were adjustable, but we were unable to give him the support that he needed to sit upright in class. But never fear, the “cardboard fairy” is here! Not only was Dorothy able to create a chair that fit this young student perfectly, she painted the entire chair and even hand drew an Elmo on the side of it, just to give it that fantastic preschool look!

Javohn and Dorothy

 

  • Full length adjustable back supports, mounted directly to the back of our standing frames that we use with children who are unable to stand without support. These back supports have helped make it easier for our staff to position children in our standers, while providing the additional back support that some of our kids need to stand in optimal alignment.
  • A customized tray for an adaptive chair which for some time we were unable to use secondary to a broken tray (the product had been discontinued). This is just the first prototype of hopefully many more trays to come, as we have several more chairs that need new trays in order to be used for our children’s educational activities.

The cardboard fairy already has several other projects in the works for us. I can’t wait to see what she brings next time she visits!

3D Printing Comes to Easterseals of SEPA!

by Sandy Masayko

The AT Department has a new tool! We are delighted to have a loan of a 3D printer to create Assistive Technology. (A 3D printer can manufacture objects by laying layers of plastic filament until the object is formed.) Thanks to Andrew Askedall, Senior Director of Product Design at MakerBot, the staff at Easterseals can now use computer assisted design to create switches, communication symbols, keyguards and more using the MakerBot Replicator +.  We thank MakerBot for the loan and we thank the PA AT Foundation‘s CEO, Susan Tachau, for making the connection between MakerBot and Easterseals.

Even before we received the MakerBot 3D printer, six ES staff members attended a workshop on “3D printing and Assistive Technology” at the Franklin Institute in February. We learned to use a free CAD (computer aided design) program called Tinkercad and we began to expand our ideas of what we can create to meet the needs of our clients.  We have begun to make many nifty items.

Skating through physical therapy

by Sarah Garman

My client Trey and I, went on a field trip Tuesday, January 16th, 2018 to the Independence Blue Cross River Rink. Trey had never been ice skating before and we spent several weeks training in order to prepare for the day. During his therapy sessions, we focused on Trey challenging his strength, balance, and coordination during a variety of therapeutic exercises. I also created activities that simulated ice skating to increase Trey’s self-confidence prior to being out on the ice. With each therapy session, our excitement grew in anticipation for the field trip.

Trey and his mom, Katrina, arrived to the River Rink fully prepared for a day on the ice with hats, gloves, and scarves in addition to protective elbow and knee pads. The River Rink supplied the ice skates, popular music, and fun environment. Trey had a blast ice skating with his mom and I. Even though he was well protected- he didn’t fall once! With a little help, Trey discovered that he can ice skate! Trey looks forward to participating in more field trips and even wants to go ice skating again!